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Wednesday, January 22, 2020

The ten best

A friend of mine posted a link to one of those "Ten Best Books Ever Written" things, where someone sets him/herself up as the arbiter of taste for the whole English-speaking world.  I tend to cast a wry eye any time someone says "these are the best ever" in some kind of definitive way.  Yes, there are standards for storytelling and writing mechanics and so on, so there are books that would undoubtedly fail on a variety of levels; but when you start looking at why one book resonates with you, but it leaves someone else completely cold, you're launching into matters of taste, which are not only highly individual, they're not true in any kind of absolute sense.

I get really impatient with people who ridicule people's taste in books, music, and art.  You know what?  If (to grab a particularly apt phrase from the Quakers) it "speaks to your condition," it's good.  Never mind if I don't like it.  You do, and that's that.  If I like Nickelback and your tastes run more to Tchaikovsky, that's just the way it goes.

(Nota bene:  I do not, in fact, like Nickelback.  Put away the damn pitchforks.)

(Nota bene again:  I also do not particularly like Tchaikovsky.  Put away the damn pitchforks.)

Anyway, it's an interesting question as to why different people like different works of whatever.  My favorite painting, for example, is Édouard Manet's A Bar at the Folies-Bergère:

[Image is in the Public Domain]

But I would be hard pressed to say why, exactly.  All I know is that it has a deep poignancy for me, so much that when I finally got to see it for real at the Courteauld Gallery in London two years ago, it brought me to tears.

On my other blog, Skeptophilia, I've dealt with the issue of musical taste, in particular how specific music effects people's brains -- resulting in the feeling of chills we get when we hear music that moves us emotionally.  Of course, showing that this happens and showing why a particular person resonates to a particular piece of music are two different things -- and the research into the former isn't getting us any closer to finding the reason for the latter.

That said, I thought it would be interesting to return to the literary, and see if I could come up with my ten favorite books.  I limited it to fiction (although there is non-fiction I love as well; maybe I'll deal with that in another post).  Here's what I came up with, in reverse order:
10. The Lathe of Heaven (Ursula LeGuin)
9. 1Q84 (Haruki Murakami)
8. Lord of the Rings (J. R. R. Tolkien)
7. And Then There Were None (Agatha Christie)
6. Good Omens (Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman)
5. Neverwhere (Neil Gaiman)
4. The Name of the Rose (Umberto Eco)
3. Watership Down (Richard Adams)
2. Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki (Haruki Murakami)
1. Foucault's Pendulum (Umberto Eco)
I'm sure if I sit and think longer, I'll go, "Wait, I forgot ______!" and revise the list, but this was my first pass at the task.  These are all books I keep returning to over and over, some of which I first read a long time ago (my first reading of And Then There Were None was when I was twelve, and it hooked me on murder mysteries for life -- and Christie's approach to a whodunnit significantly influenced my own mystery series, The Snowe Agency Mysteries).

So -- those are my top ten.  What are yours?

3 comments:

  1. I'll give you a favourite 5, in no particular order...

    Kim (Rudyard Kipling)
    The Glass Key (Dashiell Hammett)
    Feet of Clay (Terry Pratchett)
    The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Laurence Sterne)
    Museum (Eric Thacker and Anthony Earnshaw)

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    1. The only one I've read is Feet of Clay -- looks like I have some catching up to do!

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  2. 10. Bastard Out of Carolina-Dorothy Allison
    9. The Woman Who Walked into Doors-Roddy Doyle
    8. Perfume-Patrick Suskind
    7. The Bluest Eye-Toni Morrison
    6. The Wind-up Bird Chronicle-Haruki Murakami
    5. Gilead-Marilynne Robinson
    4. Raintree County-Ross Lockridge Jr.
    3. As I Lay Dying-William Faulkner
    2. The Holy Bible
    1. Hamlet-William Shakespeare
    I will comment and expand on this list on my blog. For here, I'll say that I know that Hamlet and The Holy Bible aren't novels so they may not be fair, but they are stories and I used the criteria of books that changed my life and/or my writing in ways that wouldn't have happened without having read them. For further interest and reference, see my blog soon--cbfiction.blogspot.com. Thanks.

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