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Wednesday, March 18, 2020

The long road

I've been writing fiction since I was six.

We were assigned to write a little story, then get up in front of the class and read it.  So I wrote some silly thing about a bird that falls out of his nest and bends his beak askew, and has to get help to straighten it out again (you can tell that Looney Tunes was one of the formative influences on my sense of humor).  But the day we were supposed to read to the class... well, I was terrified.  Shaking in my shoes, knees knocking together, the whole nine yards.  But I got up there and did it...

And everyone laughed.  In the right places.  They applauded at the end.  And I thought:

I want to do this forever.

I kept writing, kept reading, and kept creating.  Through elementary and high school, and into college.  I had two people who were incredible influences -- my high school and college creative writing teachers, Ms. Bev Authement and Dr. Bernice Webb -- who never lost faith in my storytelling ability even though looking back, a lot of what I wrote was pretty cringeworthy.  But the message from both of them was clear: keep writing.  You can do this.

[Image is in the Public Domain]

When I was 19 I completed my first novel-length manuscript.  Speaking of cringeworthy... but I finished it, pounding the whole thing out on an old Royal manual typewriter.  (Yes, I'm that old, falling somewhere between "cuneiform clay tablets" and "word processing software" on the great timetable of history.)  I first started trying to get published when I was around thirty, querying publishers and agents, but like a lot of aspiring writers, got 100% rejections.

Some were courteous and encouraging.  Others, such as the person who simply hand-wrote "NO" in bold print across my query letter and sent it back to me, were not so much.  I received one rejection that took nine months, and another that took -- I kid you not -- nine hours.

Finally, in 2005, I had gotten so discouraged I was on the verge of quitting, not just trying to get published, but writing itself.  By this time writing was such an integral part of me that I couldn't quite imagine what life would be like without it, but the battering-down I was getting from rejection after rejection was just too much for me.

Enter K. D. McCrite.

K. D. belongs to an online writers' group I'm in, and had read an excerpt of a manuscript I'd just completed, a sci-fi thriller called Kill Switch.  And it turned out that she knew the head of a publishing company personally -- in fact, they'd published several of her wonderful books, including her sparklingly witty young adult series The Confessions of April Grace.  She talked to the publisher about my manuscript, and then sent me an email saying, "Get your manuscript to him.  Yesterday.  I'm serious."

Three weeks later, I had a contract in my hand.

Opening that box of books when Kill Switch was published was one of the peak experiences of my life, but was also completely surreal.  It was hard to imagine that my forty-year-long dream of being a published author had finally happened.  Well, I now have thirteen books in print, six more in the publishing queue, and so many ideas bouncing around in my head that it's a wonder my skull doesn't rattle when I shake it.

In the past year, I have come to the conclusion that I don't simply want to be a novelist -- I want to help others who are where I was, trying to keep their feet on the long road leading to becoming an author.  I'd like to give back to the writing community, to lend a hand the way I was helped by people like Ms. Authement, Dr. Webb, and K. D. McCrite.  I'm putting myself out there as a fiction writers' mentor/coach -- I'd love to help writers who are stuck, have writers' block, or maybe even have an idea for a novel but have no idea how to begin.  My business is called Pen & thInk (lots more details at the link), and I'm offering everything from a short, four-week module to a full year for someone who would like to go "zero to novel."  I also have a special program for teenagers who are aspiring authors.

So I encourage you to take a look at my website, and to contact me if you're interested or would like more details.  If you would love to write a novel, what's holding you back?  I can help -- and there's no reason to wait, regardless of where you are or how long you've put it off.  Remember what the brilliant artist Grandma Moses said when asked why she'd waited until she was eighty to start painting: "Well, it was the youngest age I had left."

Contact me if you're interested.  I'd love to hear your stories -- and help you to get them onto the page.

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